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Posts Tagged ‘lobbying’


As you may have heard, the Massachusetts state of representatives passed a human trafficking bill unanimously.  HR.3470 is the bill that is supported by AG Martha Coakley.  It criminalizes the activity, creates a taskforce, and allows for the court to order restitution to victims if they win the case.  While this is certainly a step in the right direction, we need to do more for the victims.  If we do not provide the services that they need, I believe that it is highly likely that they will fall back into slavery.  S820/S1921 sponsored by Mark Montigny will provide more services for victims.  We should ask for as much as we can now to be in a stronger bargaining position if we have to compromise.

S1921 appears to be S820 without the minimum sentencing and with a more defined Safe Harbor clause.  Safe harbor would allow prostitutes under the age of 18 to be considered victims and not a criminal if they are picked up by the police during a raid. This is important because they may have a criminal record that would be detrimental in living an independent life.

Human trafficking is as much a domestic problem as it is an international one.  Many girls who are caught up in this problem are runaways or those who have been kidnapped like the Quincy teen who was forced into slavery this past May.

My real concern is that traffickers will continue to be let go even if the Coakley bill does become law.  To prove that it is a trafficking case, you have to prove that the trafficker coerced the victim.  The victims’ testimony is critical in proving coercion.  Without it, the trafficker may get off with a lesser crime.  Without services, the victim may be less likely to testify in court because they may be forced to earn money back in the trade to support themselves. If it is a labor trafficking victim (agriculture especially), they may not even remain in the state.  This is one way I feel like we can get more victim services back into the bill to show the legislators that they may still fail in getting traffickers locked up.

We could ask for a line item that would provide money for a safehouse.  As it stands in S820, it would be subject to appropriation.  Another concern I have is that the Coakley bill mentions corporations would be subject to the new law.  Small businesses like nail salons, massage parlors, and restaurants are the ones that are often the ones that enslave their workers.  When I think of corporation, I think of Wal Mart, Marriott, or McDonalds, not the Korean Massage Therapy or Hadley Massage Therapy.  I want to make sure that those businesses too will be subject to the new law.

Here are the members of the senators on the ways and means committee.  Steven Baddour,  Jennifer Flanagan, Michael Moore, Karen Spilka, Brian Joyce, Thomas McGee, Richard Moore, and Gale Candaras have cosponsored Montigny’s S.820 bill at the start of the session. It is just as important to thank them and ask for their continued support for the bill.  S820 could go before the ways and means committee soon.  I hope that some of you would have the time to contact a few members of the ways and means committee to ask them to support 820 because victims deserve more.  Senate President Therese Murray should also be called/ written to.

I have drafted my own letter that I’ve sent to members on the committee.  This is the letter that Not For Sale, an organization I’m also a part of, is asking their members to send this letter.  Feel free to include your own personal reason why you think more victim provisions is important in the human trafficking bill.  In fact, that would even be better.

Thank you for your help in this important cause.  A hollow victory is not enough.  We must pass a bill that will give the victims a chance to stand on their own.

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The Polaris Project rates the 50 states of the United States based on their human trafficking legislation

The Polaris Project included Massachusetts as part of the dirty dozen of states because Massachusetts is weak on human trafficking.  Massachusetts is one of 5 states that do not have any human trafficking legislation.  We currently have legislation that could change that.

Senate Bill 58 has morphed into Senate Bill 2589 which is weaker than the previous bill but it is still a step in the right direction.

The new bill was passed unanimously by the senate and has been referred to the House where it was then referred to the Joint Committee on Rules where it currently sits.

It can still be moved forward in an informal setting if no one in the house objects to the bill.  It is now in the hands of the house.  However, the State House needs to vote on it by the end of the year.

The Ways and Means Committee curtailed anything that cost money so they changed the taskforce to a commission and probably cut down on programs like health and job programs.  They lost the minimum mandatory sentencing for the crime of human trafficking but they also increased the sentencing.  The trust fund will still be established.  It will be largely funded by money seized from traffickers.

I encourage to write or call your state representative and to members of this committee.  I have put together a draft letter that you can use.

Remember to vote tomorrow, Tuesday Sept. 14, in the Massachusetts primaries.

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The summer recess is fast approaching and Massachusetts Senate Bill 58, an act relating to anti-human trafficking and protection, still sits before the Senate Ways and Means Committee.  It was passed favorably by the Joint Committee on Children, Families and Persons with Disabilities on July 15, 2009.  Over the past year, it has been waiting to be approved by the Senate Ways and Means Committee.  The bill will have to be reintroduced if it does not get approved by July 31. This means that Massachusetts would still be one of only 6 states that do not have human trafficking legislation.

I encourage you to write to the senators in this committee to encourage them to vote in favor of this bill.  I have written a draft letter that you can use to write out yourself or to e-mail.  Feel free to shorten it or include your personal reason why you think this bill should be passed.  You can also call them and simply ask them to support Senate Bill 58. This takes 5 minutes out of your day.  The members of the committee are found here. They will pay attention if 5 of you contact them on the same topic.  You can make a real difference.

WGBH recently did a 4 part report on human trafficking in New England.  You can read and listen to the report here.

I also recently learned that Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore are passionate about human trafficking. The Demi and Ashton Foundation facebook page has a tremendous amount of resources that you will pop up in your feed if you like the page.  I encourage you to like it to learn more about the problem.

Help me get Senate Bill 58 passed by contacting the members of the Senate Ways and Means Committee.  Thank you.

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